‘Selfie’ Tourism and How to Hike Wisely in the White Mountains

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New Hampshire offers plenty of awesome photo opps, but be sure you are ready to tackle the big ones first.

Recently, I came across the term ‘Selfie Tourism,’ a phenomenon that has immensely affected travel industry in both a positive and negative way. It was used in a video on social media, where loggers in Costa Rica chopped down a tree to capture a sleeping sloth and sell it into the tourism trade for ignorant travelers to snuggle up with in front of the camera. Not only was it horrifying to watch this poor creature fall hundreds of feet from the trees, but knowing that sloths, with a slower heart rate than most mammals, could die if startled by too much commotion in an environment where they are issued out for photographs.

 

Not only has this ‘Selfie Tourism’ threatened wildlife, but it is also inviting a new group of ignorant travelers to visit the more out-of-reach places without proper research. In the outdoor recreation community, whether you are hiking, backpacking, boating, climbing, or other, it is understood that these activities require some experience and skill. Instead, for those travelers who show up ‘for the photo,’ we’re seeing first time hikers attempting advanced trails, resulting in more emergency rescues than we’ve seen in previous years.

Let’s consider the White Mountains of New Hampshire, a popular vacation destination for New Englanders in both the summer and winter. Over the past few years, hiking trails in the region have seen double and even triple the number of visitors. Local forest rangers are working overtime to manage traffic and parking, and the once quiet summits are starting to see some bigger crowds. Many trails can be hiked in a day—the Franconia Ridge, possibly the most popular loop hike in the Whites, is a long but rewarding hike that can still have intermediate to advanced hikers home by dinner. But for those looking for specific locations, such as the coveted Bondcliff summit (which offers an awesome photo opportunity) or Mount Washington (New England’s highest peak), most amateur hikers don’t realize how strenuous the trails are, and realize while on the trail that they may be in trouble. That is the perfect recipe to call in the rescue crews.

By no means do I discourage travelers to head out into the wilderness for the lofty photo goals (I myself love sharing pictures from my adventures, just look at our Instagram page!). Instead, I urge you to prepare ahead of time—with simple training, safety checks, and consulting a professional, you can avoid disaster and get the most out of your trip. While we can adjust the following to various parts of the world, let’s instead focus on how to best prepare for a hike in New Hampshire so you can have that amazing experience safely.

 

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The AMC has high huts where hikers can stay overnight an break up their hike into two or more days. Reservations include a bed, dinner and breakfast, plus some incredible views!

Do Your Research

 

This seems redundant, but it is so important if you plan to hike the White Mountains. When looking at a peak you would like to conquer, consider the following: mileage, elevation gain (this is not the elevation of the summit, but instead the total elevation you will have to climb on the hike), terrain, and weather. Be sure to pack a map of the trail, as well as a compass (and learn how to use them!). You can pick up a White Mountain Guide through the Appalachian Mountain Club, which provides all of this information, and can give you a better idea of what to expect. Another great resource is through New England Waterfalls, which gives a chart comparing difficulty to how great the view is—perfect for beginners to choose their first 4,000-footer! Mountain Forecasts is a great resource as well for checking temperature, wind, and precipitation at the summit of each mountain, which you will need to know before you set out on the trail.

Know Your Limits and Build Up to the Big Summit

This relates to tip number one—once you research the hike you plan to do, you can then decide if you are ready. If you are beginner and you want to hike a difficult hike, I suggest trying a few easier hikes first and work your way up to the big one (like running, you can’t just start at a marathon, you need time to train). There are numerous clubs and meetups that bring beginner hikers together and help instruct you through the basics of hiking, so when the time comes to attempt your goal you are confident and ready for it. And, when looking at the mileage, if it seems like a lot for one day, look for campsites or huts to stay overnight and turn it into a backpacking trip!

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View of the Franconia Ridge from the summit of Mount Garfield

Pack with an Attitude of Caution

A word of advice: Always pack essentials for any scenario you might encounter. At minimum, make sure you have plenty of water (two liters for a day hike, three if it’s in the summer), food, warm layers (it gets cold at the top, even in July and August), and a first aid kit. I always go with the attitude that if you have to ask, the answer is probably ‘yes.’ And if you are backpacking, be sure to make sure you pack enough water (or have opportunities to refill), and have an option for bear protection (provided bear boxes, bring your bear bag, stay in a cozy hut). A don’t forget your lucky hat!

 

Know When to Turn Back

 

Sometimes things don’t go as planned. You might be more tired than expected (which can be a recipe for injury), or the weather may change quickly, or maybe you are running out of daylight and can’t make the peak. Whatever the case, don’t ever be ashamed if you have to turn back—safety come first when hiking, and if you can’t make your goal that day, don’t worry, the mountains aren’t going anywhere and you can try again when you are ready.

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They look cute, but these gray jays will steal your food!

Leave No Trace

Crowded trails means more wear and tear on the environment. For the case of preservation, hikers should practice the art of “Leave No Trace.” This includes everything from staying on the marked trails, to carrying out all the trash you bring in (including apple cores or banana peels, as those are not native to the White Mountains and could harm the ecosystem). And please, as tempting as it may be, do not feed the animals (especially those pesky gray jays!).

Consult an Expert

When in doubt, ask. You can consult with White Mountains National Forest rangers, or stop by the White Mountain National Forest Visitor Center to chat with some local experts about what you need to do ahead of your hike.

Have Fun

Clearly the most important part of hiking. At no point should the experience be bad—sure, you might be sore after a day on the trail, but you trade that with the feeling of accomplishment and plenty of memories. And of course, a nice photo that you can be proud to show off. 😀

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Sometimes hiking requires a team.

 

 

 

 

 

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Seattle: An Urban Hiker’s Paradise

Seattle, the home of 90’s grunge, Starbucks Coffee, ‘flying’ fish and plenty of rain, has become a booming metropolis that hits the top of travelers lists year after year. And how can you blame them? Seattle offers a bit of everything—from high end seafood to museums, breweries and easy access to some of the country’s highest peaks, travelers can create an itinerary guaranteed for a trip of a lifetime.

So where do you start when planning a visit to Seattle? For hikers, I advise splitting your time between the city and the nearby national parks, but make sure to hit the following spots in the city.

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Pike’s Market Inventory

Pike’s Place Market

You’ve seen the videos of fishmongers tossing large fish across their booth in front of large crowds, but seeing the spectacle first hand is wildly different. Even for the travelers who try to avoid big tourist traps, it’s hard to find an excuse to skip Pike’s. With fruit stands selling Rainier cherries and fish markets wafting that amazing ‘freshly caught’ scent, you don’t have to buy anything to get the full experience (although we recommend saving Pike’s for a lunch stop, just to buy up some of the pre-made goodies). Head to the far end towards the docks for gift shopping, with handmade jewelry and t-shirts for everyone on your list. And don’t forget to visit the original Starbucks location across the street.

BONUS STOP: If you’re an art nerd like us, be sure to visit the Seattle Art Museum. With a vast collection of Pacific Northwest totems and other sculptures, it’s a brilliant way to escape the inevitable rain of the city and learn a little about the culture of the area. If the sun is shining, take a detour over to the art museum’s satellite Olympic Sculpture Park for a more modern experience.

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Despite Seattle’s reputation as a rainy city, July through October is a perfect time to catch blue skies.

Space Needle

Another bucket list item that travelers shouldn’t miss when visiting Seattle, this iconic and extraterrestrial looking tower has become a symbol of the city (Although, first timers may expect a much larger and more prominent structure that can be seen from every point of the city. That is actually more true to Mt. Rainier in the distance.). For photographers, skip the long and expensive line up to the top of the Space Needle and instead head up to the Sky View Observatory. Or, experience the landmark from the ground, walking through the Space Needle Park complex, which includes stops at the Chihuly Garden and Glass Museum, the Museum of Pop Culture (which includes memorabilia from Nirvana and other Seattle musicians) and the Seattle Children’s Museum.

 

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Gas Works Park looking east.

Gas Works Park

 

If it’s parks with great views you’re looking for, be sure to add the Gas Works Park to your list. Located across Lake Union, this former site of the Seattle Gas Light Company offers spectacular views of the city with a steampunk-esque gas plant in the foreground. It’s a great spot for a picnic or some wandering, and lets you enjoy the city without stress of crowded streets.

Capitol Hill

Like many cities, Seattle boasts an array of neighborhoods surrounding the city center, each with their own charm. One of the more popular neighborhoods is Capitol Hill, east of downtown, at the tip of Lake Union. This area is perfect for those looking for some nightlife entertainment, with plenty of restaurants, bars, and a vibrant LGBTQ scene. Make a stop over to Volunteer Park and climb the historic water tower for more breathtaking views of the city.

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The Fremont Troll is a must-see when visiting Seattle

Fremont

Seattle is a bit quirky, and there’s no better example of such quirks than in the northern neighborhood of Fremont. Here you can see popular public art like the controversial sculpture of Vladimir Lenin, or take a photo with the Fremont Troll, an 18-foot tall sculpture of a troll under the bridge. Enjoy shopping and dining in the neighborhood center, or watch the ships go by on the canal.

Ballard

Northwest of Fremont is another quirky section of Seattle. Ballard, a fishing community, boasts its Scandinavian roots at the Nordic Heritage Museum, which tells the story of the community. And if you’re looking for some beach time, head down to the coast and relax at the Golden Gardens Park.

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Ballard Docks

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Hikers break in Olympic National Park

Get Outside

While you can easily spend a week exploring everything that Seattle has to offer, we recommend taking some time to rent a car and drive out to one of the many National Parks. Whether you’re looking for a day hike, or a multi-day backpacking trek, you’ll easily be able to find everything you need in a few hours drive. From the city, you can see the snowcapped peaks of Mt. Rainier to the south, or Mt. Baker to the north, which can both be easily reached in a day trip. Or, take a drive east to explore the North Cascades, or take the ferry west to the Olympic peninsula and spend a few days at Olympic National Park. We guarantee by the time your vacation is up, you’ll be eagerly planning another visit.

Old and New: Exploring Zürich, Switzerland on Foot

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View of Grossmünster from across the river.

When it comes to tourism in Europe, Zürich doesn’t always make the top of the list. It’s labeled as a banking city, a college town, but with a small old city center, it typically serves more as a quick stop before travelers head out to the countryside. That doesn’t mean that Zürich doesn’t have anything to offer though. In fact, it’s a perfect city for leisurely urban hiking, with enough to see and do before you catch that train to the mountains. This guide can easily be done in half a day to a full day, depending on how long you linger in each spot.

 

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As you wander the streets of Zürich, look up to catch glimpses of the clocktower of St. Peter’s.

Zürich HB Train Station

It’s worth mentioning the train station for those who may only have a few hours in Zürich. Located at the northern tip of the old city center, you’ll quickly get acquainted with this busy station. With trains traveling to/ from the airport, as well as around the country and into other parts of Europe, it’s likely you will start your journey here. If you arrive in the morning before you can check into your hotel, there are luggage lockers conveniently located on the lower level—drop your heavy bags there and head out for a walk around the city!

 

Bahnhofstrasse

Head south of the train station (and keep an eye and ear out for the extremely quiet tram cars!) onto Zürich’s main shopping drag, Bahnhofstrasse, which extends parallel with the river and all the way down to the north tip of Lake Zürich. Here, you’ll find most of the modern shops you can find in most cities—H&M, Zara, etc.—demonstrating the city’s function as what I’d like to call a ‘livable city.’ You’ll also notice Zürich’s cleanliness as you walk down this street—unlike other major metropolises like New York, Milan, or Paris, which have a distinct grittiness to their streets, Zürich is meticulously pristine. Spend some time popping in and out of shops if you have the time, and continue south until you reach…

 

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Zürich’s streets are winding, and at every turn you find beautiful little gems like this. 

Münzplatz/ Lindenhof

THIS was my favorite part of Zürich. Turning left off Bahnhofstrasse and onto Oetenbachgasse, then right onto Lindenhofstrasse, you’ll go through a small arched tunnel to an elevated park that overlooks the Limmat River. On a warm, sunny day, this is a perfect spot to stop and rest, catch up on some writing, or check your map to make a plan for the rest of your route. Snap some photos of the city, with the famed Grossmünster church across the way, and watch locals play chess or picnic with family members. Continuing south through the park, you’ll encounter the upscale Münzplatz, the medieval-aged neighborhood that now boasts trendy gift shops, chocolate boutiques, and custom watch makers. Whether you’re looking for a gift, or just browsing, this area is a wonderful snapshot of Swiss city homes—just wandering around I found myself taking notes on how to replicate the design on my future home.

 

Fountains

Zürich is famous for its numerous fountains around the city—approximately 1,200—and all dispense clean drinking water. Be sure to stop and fill up your water bottle at one of these fountains, you’ll be able to taste the difference!

 

Church Hopping

Swiss churches are far more modest than those you may find in Italy or France, but as you trek along the country’s landscape, you’ll regularly spot the distinct pointed towers of these churches. Probably the best example of this in Zürich is the Kirche Fraumünster, on the west bank of the Limmat River. You’ll have to pay to go inside, but you can also take a step back in the adjacent plaza to marvel at the Swiss design. Before you check this church off your list though, be sure to stop at the Church of St. Peter, located between Fraumünster and Lindenhof (look for the clock tower, you can’t miss it).

When it comes to churches in Zürich though, the most famous is Grossmünster, the two-towered Romanesque church on Zürich’s east bank. Entry is free, so take some time to step inside this city landmark and learn more about Switzerland’s history.

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Fraumünster’s pointed tower looms over the river and its many bridges.

Lake Zürich

If you follow the Limmat south, eventually you hit the mouth and get a full view of Lake Zürich. On a clear day, you’ll be able to see the Alps in the distance, and in the summer months, you can swim or take a boat out on to the lake. But don’t be fooled by its size, at 25 miles in length and another 2 miles wide, you could spend all day on the water. Grab a sandwich and have a picnic, or catch the sun setting at the end of the day.

 

Niederdorf Neighborhood

When you’re tired from the walk, head back towards the train station along the east bank of the Limmat, and take a detour into the Niederdorf neighborhood. This area is more hip, with trendy gift shops and plenty of bars and restaurants, and adorable side streets to explore. Take some time to sample some local favorites, and don’t forget to try the fondue!

 

BONUS: Thermalbad

Looking for something a little more relaxing? Take an afternoon or evening to visit Zurich’s Thermalbad Spa, with a rooftop bath that overlooks the city and plenty of spa services indoors—it’s a nice way to relax after a long walk around the city.